moon.gif
 
Hints & Myths about Argentine Tango
       

PREVIOUS

Bylaugh

One weekend, in November 2003, saw more Tango workshops held in the recently-refurbished Orangery of Bylaugh Hall in Norfolk.

Rodolfo Aguerrodi and Miho Omaki led workshops with a small group of local or temporarily resident participants on Friday, Saturday and Sunday - morning and afternoon.

We also visited the local milonga in Norwich on the Friday night.

NEXT

 
 

  The third workshop focused on barridas and ganchos:

     

Rodolfo first explained the importance of positioning during the giro:

   
    .. follower must take uniform length steps that are big enough so the leader can find enough space between them ...

... follower's axis must transfer smoothly in line with her leader's chest position so the leader can be sure where her legs are ...

Then we practised our leader's ability to stop his follower in mid-step of each giro position, then find our follower's feet and thighs - with their feet and without looking or touching the floor:

   
       

.. first in the middle of an open/side step:

   
    ... leader's foot finds follower's left foot ...

... collects ...

... finds follower's right foot

... then in the middle of a forward step:

   
    ... leader's foot finds follower's left foot ...

... collects ...

... finds follower's right foot

... then in the middle of a backward step:

   
    .. leader's foot finds follower's left foot ...

... collects ...

... finds follower's right foot

continuing until we were confident we knew where our partner's feet were:

 
     

We then used the giro to turn our follower into a back step on the leader's left side:

   
    ... with leader moving his left foot forward to find and accompany her right foot as it moved on into the open/side step

We then extended the idea, beginning with the back step on leader's left side:

   
    ... with leader moving his left foot forward to find and accompany her right foot as it moved on into the open/side step and, in a pasada, over his foot into a forward step on his right side ...

... when the giro was reversed as the leader's left foot finds his follower's lead right foot and appears to draw it back into an open/side step and, in a pasada, over his foot into a forward step on his left side ...

 

We then extended the idea further, beginning with the back step on leader's left side:

   
    ... with leader moving his left foot forward to find and accompany her right foot as it moved on into the open/side step and, in a pasada, over his foot into a forward step on his right side ...

... when the giro was reversed as the leader's left foot finds his follower's trailing left foot and he draws his back into a gancho ...

We then experimented with lateral ganchos, which take place in close/medium embrace when a follower's leg is prevented from collecting on an open/side by her leader's leg:

   
    ... as the open/side step is led, leader moves his unweighted leg into the space alongside - and slightly behind - his follower's weighted leg, pivoting her slightly to encourage the gancho ...

 

 
   
     

boleos

sacadas

milonga

Explore and enjoy!      
How my journey started
What you must do first
Getting around
Intertwining those legs
Having real fun
Swirling around the room
No limits
Tertulia Tango Bar
The Cambridge Tango Bar
Circulo de Belles Artes
Stunning UK Venue
Tango's nerve centre
Fun City
Friendly Natives
Close embrace maestros from Amsterdam
Teaching excellence
Teaching fun
Teqaching fantasia
Petroleo's apprentice
Milonga star
My first tango teachers
       

La Yuega is supported by Vecta Consulting Limited

www.vecta5.com

       

2002-5 Frank Morris